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as he tribesmen another see the u.s., for instance you would see them as an al qaeda member. the u.s. thinks it's killing an al qaeda member and maybe it is. but he's been a killed on the ground and yemenis seen being killed is in fact the tribesman. this is a challenge that the u.s. obama administration not released all and i would argue that the drones in the airstrikes have not actually solve the problem and they've actually exacerbated the problem the great deal. so not to go on too long, but just let me close with this last scenario. after the christmas day attack 2009, president obama asked his staff to imagine what would happen if al qaeda had been successful and i think that's a very good exercise. and if today al qaeda were able to carry out an attack, even a fairly small one not on the scale of september 11th, but on the scale of christmas day 2009, with the u.s. respond? many people, put myself into a large-scale renovation of yemen would be mistaken that the u.s. has been bombing them and for the past three years and it really doesn't seem to have had the impact of the u.
>>> booktv recently sought with michael skerker of the u.s. naval academy to talk about his book an ethics of interrogation. this interview is part of book tv's college series. it's about 20 minutes. >> you are watching book tv on c-span2. one of the things we do in booktv is visit campuses around the country. it gives us a chance to talk with professors who are also authors and today we are at the u.s. naval academy in annapolis maryland and joining us is the author of this book, michael skerker an ethics of interrogation is the name of the book. published by the university of chicago press. professor skerker, what do you do with theb academy? >> i teach the ethics class all the youngsters have to take and a number to loss of one studies to request to reduce the ethics of interrogation in your book is the philosophical books worth how to interrogate?y >> guest: >> it is the principal question number one circumstances can the state asked.yyyyyyy then there are some practical dos and don'ts as well. >> what is the geneva convention that we always talk about? spec the gene
in the fighter wing. i was there will not place blew up. i don't think any of us were thinking of terrorism than the way it is now. we were not prepared to fight to we were brought up to fight to the soviet union. i asked my teenage daughter what is going on with russia? it is a soviet union. what is that? it was of big things back then before toppled most of us had never considered iraq of saddam hussein but winning was a foregone conclusion and terrorism took us by subplot -- surprise. we thought they were rabble rouser is. the bin laden construction company how is that for irony? >> but after that things change with the world trade center bombing and september september 11th i was flying that morning. coming in from another rotation and september 10th was our first day back. essentially flying and i had come down nearly and somebody said you have to look at this. i thought what moron of the pilot could hit the tower of that size on a clear day? i thought it was an accident. then the second plane hit they sent us up to close down the airspace of the united states. that is eerie as the pilot. "
years and has already, i know, improved training techniques. >> michael skerker is a professor at the u.s. naval academy, and he is the author of this book, "an ethics of interrogation." here it is. this is book tv at the u.s. naval academy. >> is there a nonfiction of your book you would like to see featured on book tv? send us an e-mail. or tweet us. talks about the history of the office of strategic services in china and the successes and failures the organization had. this interview, recorded at the u.s. naval academy in annapolis, md., was a part of the book tv college series and is about 20 minutes. >> on your screen, a professor at the u.s. naval academy, also the author of this book, al ss in china, a prelude to a cold war. professor, if you would, start by briefly describing china's role in world war ii. >> china's role in world war ii is very complex. first of all, china entered the war first. most people in china would agree that china entered the world were to way back in 1937, july july 1937 with china and japan went to full-scale war. that fact, of course gile was not recogn
>>> was interviewed about his book that the u.s. naval academy in annapolis maryland. this interviews part of book tv college series and it's a little under 15 minutes. >> book tv is on location that the u.s. naval academy in annapolis maryland where we are interviewing some professors who are also authors. .. >> "in buddha's company" thai soldiers in the vietnam war" what warded did thailand play? >> they were a very close ally during the vietnam war. people familiar would know that not only did thailand send troops to fight along the united states, but also served as a base for many aircraft for bombing missions over ho chi minh trail, over laos and at the time we had built seven their bases and developed a port as well to facilitate the u.s. effort and also many soldiers went to bangkok and in terms of support thailand was the close ally. >>host: did they have soldiers? >> absolutely. they spent 37 -- cent to 37,000 soldiers to fight in vietnam also they sent smaller naval units but defin
were in, we felt safe and comfortable there. and i feel like my father, he wanted us to have an education. he knew that education was the key to a better life, but i really think he got -- he thought all of us would come right back home and try to work from there. >> you can watch this and other programs online at booktv.org. .. this interview as part of book tv college series, about 20 minutes. >> and your watching book tv on c-span2. one of the things we do is visit campuses around the country. it gives us a chance to talk with professors who are also authors, and today we are at the u.s. naval academy in annapolis to maryland. joining us is the author of this book, michael skerker, an ethics of interrogation is the name of the book published by the university of chicago press. professor, first of all, what do you do at the naval academy? >> i am an ethicist. to see at this glass that all the answers have to take in some upper levels las, religiousyy studies and that they courses. >> would you say your book is a philosophical book or a how to interrogate book? >> it is
be very important because of pre-war because china as well as the united states u.s. to lift the asia first and second strategy which has become a major issue. while most of the british try t down play that role and i think in retrospect, both sides had this validity and the argument, and by the time china had becom very important toward the end o 1943, 1944 the nature of the  had changed because the u.s. original strategy was to drive the japanese to the western pacific to the edge to go north and through the japan homeland. but by the end of 1943 to 44 particularly after the battle o the philippines. so the land route which was urgently planned by china have become much less significant. so that's why it is very mplex. >> professor why did you plan the attack in china in 1937? >> that is a long story. to make it short, both japan an china were military and economically in the 1930's and japan has a very different national psyche than the chinese. there are big, divide
father want the us to have an education. we knew that education was to a better life. i think he taught all of us would come back home and try to work from there. >>> you with catch this and overprograms online at booktv.org. >>> in an interview conducted on the campus of george mason university during the fall for the book festival. in the book she shares her experience with growing up in mexico without her parents. who immigrate to the united states illegally to find work. this is about half an hour. >> what is -- [inaudible] >> the way u grew up knowing it was it was the reference to the united states, but to me because i grew up in the hometown surrounded by mountains, i didn't know where the united states was to me it was the other side of the mountain. during the time my parents were gone, working here in the u.s. i will look at the mountain something i parents were over there on the other side of the mountains. that was what it meant to me. >> where did you grow up? originally where were u born. >> in mexico. southern mexico in the little city that nobody has heard of. why mentio
and they get familiar with them. that's what they use. they resist change and coordination. they resist trying to work together and that is the fundamental problem we have. >> we tried to switch off occasionally. i think one of the other issues i wanted to ask about was counseling because the coordination program as well as the transition gps program that the president has proposed and we are moving forward on call for the counselors and we know the problems and mental health, but how are we planning for the kind of counselors agree to be needed for this? because clearly they have to be cross trained in many ways understanding both systems as well as small business, etc.. how are we planning for the emerging of these kind of folks that are going to be critical to this but we don't have them in any great number. >> that, i think is the key to making this transition work is to have the counselors that are familiar both with veterans and the defense areas. what are the benefits, what are the opportunities that are available and be able to present that. so it is going to take some training of the
she and the professional educators year aircraft for the u.s. navy in 10 years ago made the transition to academia where the provided the outstanding opportunity for graduate school to have a specialty in a geographic part of the world where i specialize in middle eastern history. >>host: allen author "the politics and security of the >>guest: it is. the part of the world with united states has been involved in the iran-iraq war, desert shield, desert storm and operation in iraqi freedom. it is a big topic and it needs to be discussed and investigated. >>host: where do you begin talking about u.s. involvement? >>guest: the u.s. involvement in the valleys goes much further back. we specifically look at the persian and gulf even though they sent some ships it is really world for to the united states and military get involved in a big way. surprisingly it does not have to do with the oil. world war ii marked the entry of the united states and its military to provide a secure pathway for supplies to the beleaguered soviet russian allies in their quest to defeat the germans.
at the manhattan institute. thank you for joining us. the question of whether and how government, particularly the federal government directs tax dollars to specific industries was a discussion in last night's presidential debate and has become an important and ongoing theme in the current presidential campaign. the terms by which washington assisted the finance and auto industries have been the focus of intense debate but the most contentious example of all is the one on which diana furchtgott-roth, senior fellow and speaker this afternoon focuses in her timely and important new book "regulating to disaster: how green jobs policies are damaging america's economy". in it, she subjects assumptions and policies which led to such ill-fated federal investments as that of the now bankrupt solyndra solar panel manufacturer as well as the a 123 caller battery manufacturer to a withering analysis which we at the institute have come to expect of the oxford trained economist whose chief of staff for the council of economic advisers. sorry. during the administration of president george w. bush. in her bo
. >> richard ruth was interviewed about his book "in buddha's company" at the u.s. naval academy. this is part of book tv's college series and it's a little under 15 minutes. >> host: book tvs on location at the u.s. naval academy in a aanapolis. professor ruth, what do you teach? >> guest: i teach southeast asian history. i concentrate on tie lan and vietnam. >> host: why is it important for students to know southeast asian history. >> guest: united states is still very much engaged in that corner of the worldment we have many alis and partners we're working with, and many students, midshipman, are going to be officers who are going to go to southeast asia and represent our interests there. so i think it's important for them to know southeast asian history to be comfortable with the culture and have some knowledge of their history. >> host: well, professor ruth. one of our long-time allies is thigh taken, and you have written a book called "in buddha's company: thai sole soldiers in the vietnam war." what role did they play? >> guest: thailand was a close ally of the united states during the
, streets and the neighbors. tell us about that. >> well, you know, we were in baker county, you hear about, you read about some of the sheriffs of earlier years, but the gator and the sheriff in our county wanted to be known as the gator. the gator actually ruled everything, everyone in the county. you can imagine looking at the westerns from earlier days, anyone like him, but he was worse than what you see in your worst western. but growing up in that, my family lived, my great, great grandparents had come to baker county, i don't know whether they came as slaves or not, but i know they ended up there as sharecroppers, and with the intent on buying land. and that they did. they bought enough land that the area where i grew up is still today called hopkins down. and lots of families, but it was that way commute, the hawkins lived in one area. the williams and another, but we were all one big family, and felt we had to help each other. and so i was raised up on a farm, and my father, there were five girls, you know, any farmer wants a son. i guess any man wants a son, but my mother and fath
have given us arab awaking 101, 201 and 301. >> next, steve ratner talks about addressing the fiscal cliff. of he was joined by the state department's chief economist at the world affairs council to talk about president obama's second term and policy changes ahead. this is about an hour. [applause] >> thank you very much for that introduction. lori has said to me that since we started a bit late, provided it's okay with our speakers, we'll run a little built late, maybe five or ten after two. i'm going to ask them questions for about 40 minutes and then throw the floor open to you. so get your notebooks out and your questions, you can grill them in a moment. before starting, lori asked me to set the frame a little bit and to talk just for a moment about the u.s. competitiveness and the u.s. economy in a global context. and their actually was an oecd report that came out this morning that does that admirably. this report predicts that within four years, by 2016, the chinese economy will be bigger than the economy. and what the oecd report sort of further says, it's a great report. if
states an authorization to use military force, a declaration of war or any similar authority shall not authorize the detention without charge or trial of a citizen or lawful permanent resident of the united states apprehended in the united states unless an act of congress expressly authorizes such detention. that affirms the second circuit's clear statement rule from the padilla case. now, some may ask why this amendment protects green card holders as well as citizens and others may ask why the amendment does not protect all persons apprehended in the united states from indefinite detention. let me make clear i would support providing the protections in this amendment to all persons in the united states, whether lawfully or unlawfully present, but the question is is there enough support in this body to expand this amendment to cover others besides united states citizens and green card holders? i do not believe there is. we got 45 votes last year. we have gained support this year. and so my hope is that at least we can clear the law with a clear statement on citizens and legal resid
u.s. ambassador to pakistan the ambassador to the united states and former adviser to hillary clinton. hosted by the world affairs council of america, this is 45 minutes. [applause] >> is a great pleasure to be here with such a great panel, three ambassadors and one globally renowned journalist and scholars. so i've been told there have been a lot of questions about pakistan and afghanistan so far and i think we have a first-rate panel to start dealing with them. what i'm going to do in terms of focusing the discussion is i'm going to key off with questions to each of our panelists, one each and allow for a little bit of follow up and then i will open the floor to use and you will have more time to engage with them. let me begin with ambassador munter. you already got his bio, but i think in some ways he is almost uniquely positioned to provide us a very recent perspective on what pakistan looks like in the united states to official american advisers and diplomats and also the u.s. pakistan relationship during what was an exceedingly difficult and trying time which is no refle
volunteer work in the u.s. and around the world. this was recorded in fairfax virginia and is about 20 minutes. >> host: "the voluntourist" is a book by ken budd. what is it about? >> guest: this is a way to do it if you can take two years to join the peace corps. postmark when did you start voluntary? >> guest: i started after hurricane katrina. host mark what caused you to do this? >> guest: it was one of those times in my life when i didn't know what i was doing, and that this opportunity came up and i thought was perfect because i had no skills whatsoever. i did whatever they ask for in skilled people come in, they clean up than they do the serious work. so we did very basic labor. but it was necessary later. >> host: did you feel that your two weeks in new orleans was worthy? >> guest: guesstimate everywhere that i went from a question that. i said, what can you really do in two weeks? beyond the fact that yes, it is helpful to paint a house, but there was an intangible quality that it was good to be in new orleans nine months after hurricane katrina. people were so happy to have
. one more. yes, please. >> what this likelihood that the regime will use chemical weapons and what should we or could we do if they do? >> good question. that's one of the questions that no one has an answer, understand what circumstances would the regime use chemical weapons. i suspect they don't want to use them because that would galvanize the exact international response they're trying to avoid. the don't want this type of mass blood-letting that will compel the international community to intervene much more assertively than it has. so i don't think they're going to use chemical weapons. the fear is, though, if the regime -- if the opposition gains the upper hand, if the regime is on its last legs will they want to go down in flames or will they want to launch a chemical attack against israel, for instance, desperately trying to turn a domestic conflict into an arab israeli war that will take the pressure off them for a little bit, coe aless the people around israel and soing for. that's the dooms day scenario. >> wonderful, thank you so much for being here. [applause] >> i wou
on the battlefield. and they are held under the law of war because we don't want to let them go back to killing us, and they are not given a lawyer because we're not trying to solve a crime, we're trying to win a war. and here's the question. to my good friend from california, i don't want anyone to believe that under the law of war construct that we have created over the last seven or eight years, that you can be put in jail because you look like a muslim, that you sound like a muslim, that you have got a name muhammad. what happened to japanese american citizens, they were put in military custody because we were all afraid and they looked like the enemy. that was not a high point in america. what are we talking about here? we're talking about detaining people under the law of war who are suspected of joining al qaeda of the taliban in engaging in a belligerent act against the united states. now, i want to make the record clear that some of my colleagues on the republican side have been trying to deny law of war detention to the obama administration, and they have openly said this. if you allow t
not understand the military? so the budget hearings required us of course, we don't talk about all of the sudan's but i like teaching the course. >> the idea to give a government check there is extra responsibilities. >> and also one more project, a book giveaway? >> one time one-shot that we have a load of fox we collected a bunch of books have never been paid per truckload to go to a landfill. so let's do another and another. we just passed five 5/6 billionth book. looked at the football field. side to side with and that is about to tractor to there and it is a library and a box. then we send items so some of the review books we dead and we believe we have the largest volunteer base contribution in the world that we can ship in expensive way. we have 4,048 contained but other organizations start at 16,000 because they use individuals. we bring them in and sort them out. >> and but to other countries? >> we have done 40 countries. most african but you pakistan, tajikistan and south american countd sort them out. >> and but to other countries? >> we have done 40 countries. most african but you
the synergy that is gained of all the services in order for us, nor to meet our nation's needs and the synergy and balance necessary to move forward and it limits the new strategy. one of the issues i have come when people do an evaluation of the army, look at brigade combat team, how many brigade combat team compounded when you for the future. that's important to that's fundamental to what we do. however, people tend to forget many other parts about the army that is so critical to us supporting the joint force. first, 75% of the operational forces special operations forces is army. can't forget about that. we are responsive camera to make sure we stay responsive to civil authorities and for the example we continue to make sure we have the right capability to respond to wildfires, hurricane relief, and as you see what's going on today up in the northeast. we provide a broad range of essential services today to combat and commanders that includes intelligence, surveillance, reconnaissance for all the geographic combatant commanders. we provide air and missile defense to all geographical combata
. are you using that risk shipping process to bring your vendors up to standards, and i would be interested in the tape on using the contracting process rather than the regulatory process. >> okay. we already doing that. we have standard language in every language, that it will follow the nasa security policies and procedures. we have created that and put that together, and we also have the regulations that massive supplements to that that speaks to that. we have also addressed it that way. that is the minimum of what you have to do. what we need to do is raise the bar. once that language is in there, maybe five years old or 10 years old or even five minutes old, five minutes later, the bar is raised and it is continually vigilant. and the challenge is how you can tinley pulled accountability to the contractor for things that are always changing. there is no easy answer to that. you just keep plugging along. >> and you say that is a better solution than doing it as a blanket regulation, even across specific sectors? >> i'm saying that that is a minimum. >> i like the idea of it. the idea of
, with the right leadership america is about to come roaring back. .. >> host: joining us on by "communicators" this week before the election is mignon cyburn, who after chairman genachowski it was the senior democrat on the federal communications commission. commissioner mignon cyburn, we could start with you. what has your assessment then, reports are up 25% of cell phone towers have been knocked out and people are now using payphones because the service is not working. what is your assessment of the carriers and their ability to maintain phone service for people in the affected areas of sandy. >> guest: thank you to the both both of you for allowing me to be there for you today. my condolences go out to the families. there are many loved ones lost in this tragic event. my condolences go out to them, and of course, my hats off to those brave people who continue to answer the call. in terms of the engagement, as you know, the german literally spent the night at the agency. our public safety% of the same. we are definitely engaged in the process that we have been working firsthand went as far
explores why some firms fail. this week david k. johnston diss his book "the fine print" how they use plain i english to rob you blind. visit booktv.org for more information in an interview taped outside of washington, d.c., wayne karlin talking about his book wandering souls which is an account of the u.s. soldier return to vietnam to return a notbook he took from a soldier he killed during the north vietnam war. >>> joining us now on booktv is author and professor wayne karlin who most recent book is "wandering soul." professor karlin who was homer? >> he is a friend of mine who retired living in north carolina. he was a officer platoon leader in the vietnam war. and he had contacted me a number of years ago because i had some contacts in vietnam vietnamese i had been working with, he had taken a documents and a book from the body of an vietnamese soldier he killed during the war. and wanted to see if he could find a family and return those documents to this them. >> why. he had gone through decades of ptsd, not only because he killed that man, he had a rough war, he killed many people he
during the administration of president george w. bush. she helps us understand while the failures of private firms have significant problems themselves and cautionary tales to have the government rather than private investors allocate capital. the publication of regulating to disaster caps her first year as a senior fellow in which she has been prolific and influential cited by a writers, reporters and talk show host across the country. to think of her many contributions ranging from her analysis demonstrating even adjusting for the state of the economy those receiving food stamps it is that an all-time high. to another that we'll companies are not monopoly's controlled by a few but an important source of wealth and income for millions of average americans. whether clear markets coming tax notes or testified before congress she it is a powerful and detective voice. as you will agree after her talk. diana furchtgott-roth holds degrees from oxford university and were spurred college. she also served on the staff of the domestic policy council under george hw bush and his staff econo
in the white house having different towns about posture. using the changes if he gets a second term? goes back to the tone he had before? >> i wrote about his policies around poverty and he stopped talking about poverty the last couple years. i would like to think he would go back to poverty in 2007. .. >> the low-income population grew 71%. the english language learning population grew 169%. these are the issues we have to address in this state. thank you all for joining us up. [laughter] >> this event took place at the 17th annual texas book festival in austin, texas. for more information about the festival visit texasbookfestival.org. >> brooke stoddard joined booktv at george mason university in virginia to talk about his book, "world in the balance." mr. stoddard was one of the authors appearing at the fall for the book festival, held annually at the university. this is just under half an hour. >> and you're watching booktv tv on c-span2. we are on location at george mason university. university. every fall for the book festival called fall for the book. one of the authors who was speakin
effectively? he's so passionate about real data and real legal principles and be found as judge walker told us and chat and i refer to that decision, that if we have real data, we will always counter our foes who are trying to throw bias at the sabrett is passionate about that and that is loud be institute to be so successful in what it's done. he has the talent for tracking leading scholars from all over the country in an incredibly successful way so that over the years we have watched brad with his organizational chart and he filled in all the slots and we arrived at where we are today. so i thank you very much for the contribution he has made for us and i will turn it over to him to introduce the panel. >> thanks so much, tom. [applause] i want to start out by thanking tom. we were here at the very beginning like he said in this very room and his step with us along the way and that's really important to work here and around the country. i also want to thank matt and -- for putting together this great panel and doing all the work that gets all of us here in his room for this great commerce s
off the magnet. .. who are using undocumented workers. that will cut down the flow by about 90% of the border. that makes it possible to secure the border for those that are trying to come across for nefarious purposes for criminals enterprises. we can stop them at the border. then we say to those that are here in an undocumented status you are on probation paying a fine and this is to me what i find when i talk to people the most emotional issue in all of this is language. i find americans across the generations don't want us to have to sing the national anthem in two languages at the world series. they won the national anthem in english even if they were american. so they have to agree if they want to stay here permanently they have to agree to read, write and speak english. i find that among the undocumented workers they have no problem with this. they want to learn english. they understand that to live the american dream they have to learn to speak english. it's only liberals who inhabit college campuses and education departments who have a problem with english becoming the
generation starting to use their hands more and work together in communities and share ideas a little more. digital tools -- he created a magazine for the movement. baker affairs which are hugely successful, 100,000 people come over the weekend, there was one in new york a couple weekends ago. the maker of movement was something they identified first, leading edge tech publishers, so not incidental that they spotted this was technologically driven ball so -- i hope tim o'reilly will forgive me the roots are in the 60s kind of social change, power of the people. they have their roots in the country and recognize justice steve jobs it a cultural revolution under this as well. it was a combination of digital technology and new tools allowing people to do extraordinary things and the recognition that people want to use their hands. we are all makers on something. if you r cook your maker. if you our gardener you are a maker. kids are born makers. there is the dignity in holding something made in your hand but we didn't have the skills to do this stuff. most of us didn't have the skills and wha
process ps and other things for the disabled, for us to have some business opportunities with new and good ideas. american businesses will be able to export their expertise and their products in new markets, serving the hundreds of millions of people living with disabilities around the world. let me tell you why it's important for us, even though our standard are good and high in helping the disabled, to worry about those with disabilities in other countries. there are estimates that 10% of the world's population lives with disabilities. not only these people courageously live each day, they live with many challenges and hurdles that could be removed with the rights and -- with the right laws and policies that are contained in this convention. it's hard to believe but 90% of children with disabilities in developing countries never attend school. less than 25% of the countries in the united nations have passed laws to even prohibit discrimination on the basis of disability. studies indicate that women and girls in developing countries are more likely than men to have a disability. unemploym
security is imperative to the success of today's military. which, by the way, uses 93% of the energy that's used by the federal government, which is the largest user of energy in this country. as our current chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, general dempsey, has said, without improving our energy security we are not merely standing still as a nation, we are falling behind. let's be clear. energy security is national security. and our military leadership understands this. other countries, including some of our strongest competitors, also understand this and we ignore this fact at our own peril. i saw some of the innovations that the navy has adopted earlier this year when i chaired a hearing for the energy subcommittee on water and power down in norfolk aboard the uss kersarge. the purpose was to highlight the advancements the navy continues to make in harnessing renewable energy resources. up with of those resources i saw is homegrown -- homegrown biofuels. and the navy recently demonstrated the capability of advanced biofuels during massive exercise that featured a carrier strike gr
of us under new historical conditions to help a potential dangers and to remain clearheaded. we must be innovative in our thinking and maintaining energy. we must always put people above. we must work hard and preserve the integrity. these characteristics hold great promise for the future and a success intends is contingent of young people, the whole party should care about our young people and learn about what they have in mind and encourage their growth and support them. young people should respond to the parties outlook on life and sense of values and always cherish our country and our great nation. [speaking in native tongue] let the youthful vigor shine with radiant vibrance. [applause] [speaking in native tongue] >> translator: the success of chinese characteristics cannot be achieved without a concerted effort of the chinese nation. our common course depends on unity. all party members must ensure unity and must pursue the unity of the whole party and the unity of all ethnic groups in china including promoting great unity of the peoples of other countries. we should complete a
it's a good idea. why it's important as we go out to the major funders, it will be helpful for us to be able to show and hear a lot of people have already donated and shown their interest and how important this is to the donation. so i would encourage all of your viewers to do that no matter how modest. $50, $25, the numbers are more important at this point. >> and two -- of your favorite american authors from your past or current? >> i have children and grandchildren, that's like schedule me who is my favorite child or grandchildren. there are so many. it we are blessed that there are so many. i certainly have grown up as a student reading hemmingway and stenbeck. i have gravitated toward the poet. i love the great poet who can't? , i mean, i have -- sitting on my night stand, which i turn to every night and every morning. so there's so many. i hate to think about one or two. >> malcom 0 hagueen is the founder and chairman of the foundation of the american writers museum inspect is booktv on c-span2. >>> booktv will be live at the miami book fair international held on the miami d
who chaired their respective parties' congressional campaign committees. >> host: and now joining us on "the communicators" this weekend before the election is fcc commissioner mignon clyburn who after chairman genachowski is the senior democrat on the federal communications commission. commissioner clyburn, if we could start with events of the week. >> guest: yes. >> host: hurricane sandy. >> guest: yes. >> host: um, what is your assessment? there have been reports that up to 25% of cell towers in the northeast have been knocked out, that people are now using pay phones because their service is not working. what is your assessment of the carriers and their ability to maintain phone service for people in these affected areas? >> guest: peter, first of all, allow me to thank you, the both of you, for allowing me to be here today. um, also, my condolences, of course, go out to the families. there are many loved ones who were lost in this, in this tragic event, so my condolences go out to them, and, of course, hats off to those brave first responders who answered, continue to answer the
before we did the plan, the u.s. was a system of mexico with $36 million. here we are, this neighbor that's so important to us, we're assisting. at the same time, the united states will give 25 #% of all the foreign aid that we do, a lot of money. israel, egypt, pakistan, iraq, and afghanistan. nothing wrong with that, but we have to work with our frens to the south. we put in 1.4, and with additional money, it's $1.9 billion. for every one dollar we help with mexico, they spend $13. they spend a lot of money on security. they got to -- we got to understand what they are doing. now, what we started off, we did the easy thing, buy them hell cometters, buying this, and e worked with george bush, and filed the first legislation before bush talked about the plan because i felt that strongly about helping mexico, but nevertheless, we worked together. we did the easy thing with mexico, the helicopters and the planes. the hard part is this is we got to start training or billing the capacity, the prison systems, the prosecutors, the policemen. we're working on it at the federa
his career change to public educators. >> host: tell us a little bit about your book and the journey that you underwent before you started the academy which let you writing this book. >> well, the book -- well, it is a little bit about that journey but really how that journey kind of informed white the academy has become and how that could inform what classrooms could become more what learning to become, and not in just the kind of high by in the sky kind of way, with this is really happening. it feels like we are at this inflection point it was going on in the classrooms. this whole adventure for me started someone very inadvertently. the 2004, i was working as an analyst at a hedge fund at the time. i had just got married, family from new orleans visiting me in boston after my wedding and it turned out one cousin was having trouble, 12 years old. i had trouble believing that. we share a certain amount of dna. and when i asked her about it, it was her mama told me. i'm having trouble with units. yeah, let me to you. i think she that i was bluffing. now, were going to work this out.
communicators," the impact of that decision 30 years later on telecommunications. joining us in a round table discussion is professor roger noll of stanford, as well as professor jerry hausman of mit. both of these gentlemen were involved at various levels in the breakup or the decision to break up at&t. joining us here in our washington studio is paul barbagallo of bloomberg. professor noll, first of all, what was your role or activity during the breakup of at&t, and what led to that decision? >> guest: well, the roots of the antitrust case were in a presidential task force that was formed during the johnson administration in the late 1960s called the telecommunications policy task force. it had concluded that the telecommunications industry, at least the part of it that was in the federal jurisdiction, could be competitive and made recommendations both to the -- mainly to the federal communications commission about how to cause that to happen. then when the nixon administration came along, the holdover staff in the antitrust division after watching for a couple of years decided to pursue an
the founders were envisioning it was what people were used to for much of the history of the country that forces us to really look at what we mean by democracy and how we can get back. with slow democracy does is it offers a worldly thinking and a set of principles so that people can find their own policies that work for themselves and their own communities. we have town hall meetings and they worked incredibly well but in california that is in the tradition and there are others people can build on but if they can look and say okay in order to be really a valuable democratic process something needs to be inclusive and the lubber to it and it needs to be empowered. that provides enough of a framework for people to say here's how we can do it in our area. we don't have to have town halls we can have oranges and others in california so people can take that inspiration and use it wherever they are and hopefully i think in some ways that can have an impact on the national conversations. >>> rosemary gibson reports on the creation of the patient protection and affordable care act and its r
for joining us at the heritage foundation. we welcome those who joined us on our heritage.org web site on these occasions. we ask everyone in the house if he would be so kind as to check cellphones one last time and see that they are turned off. amazing how many speakers start doing that. we will post a program on our web site within 24 hours for your future reference and of course our internet viewers are always welcome to e-mail us with questions or comments, simply writing those to speaker@heritage.org. our guest today, dr. juan williams is a native of arizona, a master's degree at arizona state university and received his doctorate from the university of california santa barbara. throughout his high school and college, however, he spent most of his time playing drums in a variety of things. as a rock drummer he was part of several groups one of which opened for steppenwolf among other performers for those old enough to remember that. his first film, rocking the wall about rock music had spared in bringing down communism started airing on pbs this weekend will continue throughout th
excellent idea. unfortunately, only one-third of that is going to be used. so $200 million is going to go unspent that can go out and serve unserved america today. the same issue will be in front of us in 2013. that's what windstream's waiver is all about, is there other ways to think about this other than setting the 775 limit. and beyond that i think getting on to the model that we need going forward for universal service funding. the industry, the usta has put forth a model, but the fcc has to come up with their own model which will drive caf ii is what we're calling it, the connect america fund 2, so that's where the biggest bang for the buck will be in our business. because remember, as we looked at these more than minor changes in the financials of the telephone companies across the country, it was so important that we do these two things coincidentally. we kind of got a little bit out of sync. we've gotten one done very effectively, efficiently and fast. it's happen realtime, it's showing up in the numbers today, we've just got to work this usf thing out x it's about the cons
unspent that can go out and serve unserved america today. the same issue will be in front of us in 2013. that's what windstream's waiver is all about. is there other ways to think about this other than setting this $775 limit? beyond that, i think getting on to the model that we need going forward for universal service funding. the industry, put forth a model, but the fcc needs their own model which will drive calf too, that's where the energy needs to be put. that's where the biggest bang for the buck will be in the business because, remember, as we looked at these more than minor changes in the financials of the telephone companies across the country, it was so important that we do these two things coi understand didn'tly. -- coincidentally. we got out of sync, one down efficiently and fast. we just have to work the usf thing, and it's about the consumer. >> host: jeff gardner, president and ceo of the windstream corporation. he is also chairman this year of the u.s. telecom trade association. he's been our guest on "the communicators" along with paul barbagallo of bloomberg.
tweet us your feedback, twitter.com/booktv. for the next 45 minutes, larry schweikart presents a history of america's global participation and influence from 1898 to 1945. the author posits that during this time the united states introduced numerous political, cultural and economic ideas to the rest of the world. >> good afternoon. thank you for joining us here at the heritage foundation in our louis lehrman auditorium. we welcome those who join us on our web site on all these occasions. if you'll be so kind to check cell phones one last time and see that they're turned off. thank you, larry. amazing how many speakers actually start doing that when i say that. we will post the program on our web site within 24 hours for our future reference and, of course, our internet viewers are always welcome to e-mail us with questions or comments, simply writing those to speaker@heritage.org. our guest today, dr. larry schweikart, is a native of arizona. he earned his bachelor and master's degree at arizona state university and received his doctorate from the university of california santa
to be a bigger and more difficult issue and it deserves more than 10 seconds, but particularly the attacks on u.s. corporations and intellectual property is the core problem. on some national dialogue i think it's a very interesting interesting subject and a great question. i think there's a lot that could be done in the investment area and relating to that in the ipr area. it's been more successful at the subnational level than the national level. governors and china want to invest more than their national governments want to encourage it. and, perhaps you can use leverage to improve icr performance at the regional level in china which is where the real problem lies oic real possibilities here. >> please join me in thanking this terrific panel. [applause] >> could i just note it as was mentioned before we have a really exceptional book event opportunity nine days from that day in the afternoon on wednesday, november 28. we will be putting out an announcement. thank you. [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversation
you. >> you're watching booktv. up next martha us nos balm talks about anti-muslim bigotry in the west. this is just over an hour. [applause] >> well, thank you very much, mark, for that great introduction. and i want to thank the seminary coo open for making it possible and also especially thank you for being here. i'm overwhelmed to see so many people. because my main hope is to engage with you and spend at least a half hour on q & a, i'm going speak briefly and what i'm going to do is introduce the book in a general way and focus on just one section about the bands in europe. once, not very long ago, americans and europeans prided themselves on their enlightened attitudes of religious toleration and understanding. although everyone knew that the history of the west was characterized by intense religious animosity and violence including such bloody episodes as the crusades and the wars of religion. but including as well, the quiter violence of colonial rebelling use domination by europeans in many parts of the world and added antiseminism and -- the gnat disifm which implicated grerm
. permanent military professor at the u.s. naval academy. what does that title mean. >> guest: well, we represent the permanent military professors, a hybrid, a joining of the professor officer corps and professor and the professional educators here at the naval academy. i spent the first half of a naval career flying aircraft for the u.s. navy, and about ten years ago made the transition to academia, where the navy provided an outstanding opportunity to go back to graduate school and get a specialty in a geographic part of the world where i specialize in middle eastern history. >> host: and now an author. "the politics and security of the gulf" is the numb of your book. that's kind of a big topic. >> guest: it is. it's part of the world where the united states has been involved in three hot wars in the past generation, the iran-iraq war, desert shield, desert storm, and operation iraqi freedom. it's a big topic, and it needs to be discussed, and investigated, which is part of the reason why we took on this topic. >> host: in your book, where do you begin talking about u.s. involvement
. and in instances where they could, they brought in satellite trucks to actually use satellite to backhaul the information, avoiding -- where it was necessary, avoiding the land line networks and using satellite. using generators, using batteries to really try and keep the network up and running. >> host: now, what about b emergency communications? how were they affected? >> guest: the psaps, the public safety answering points, the folks who field 911 calls, very few of them went down. they're sort of consolidated so they don't have a lot of areas that they have to really protect. so we saw that 911 worked well, and i think the mayor's office in new york city talked about, boy, use text where you can. i think that's a good message to deliver to consumers. use texting wherever you can, leave the phone calls to 911, to the really important calls. and otherwise use texting or use your data connections to gather information. >> host: did the spectrum get flooded with information and overloading? >> guest: sure. their, i mean, usage was pretty tremendous, and we found this out wherever you have
in the nation's history, so we are asking everyone to work with us. we are working closely with the governors and mayors and i also pleased that they are on top of things and focusing on what it's going to take to get their communities and their states' back. the governor affected by the storm have been particularly apt and working with communities and coordinating local response. so, patience is going to be the watchword of the day. we cannot wave a magic wands and get power back on. the companies did prepossession and equipment that the storm has to clear and the water has to go down. in many places tiberi has to be removed before power repairs can take place. it is a domino effect and unfortunately, that takes time and requires patience. we are moving heaven and earth. we will continue to move heaven and earth to get things done as quickly as possible. so, work with us. patience, i know it's so hard when you're out of your home and out of your environment. you have no power, you may have no phones. we all understand and sympathize. we want to make sure that you can return and return safely
us? we been halted by the long, but this time of what to document every step of the way. one of my triplet sons was taken out of football because of concussions years ago. now knowing what i know, the game can be made safer. the game is being made safer. so very quickly what we did is we parachuted into oklahoma. we've been following 18 for the entire season. we started in february at each monthly visit them for a week. we've been filming them. their concussion rate has plummeted to we put together our risk management program, 15 different steps. we have a celeron matters, hit sensors on their helmet at the high school level, so we are tracking heads. we are tracking everything that these boys walk we been able to get them. no helmets, not just a correct fit but how to measure it. most import message i have is that the kids want these ether and their helmet or as an earbud or mouthpiece. they want that responsibility taken away from themselves. so right now they are underreported and this this is really helping. >> let me bring bill maher to this conversation. as we mentioned as an
ground among the economists where we are going to end at the end of the date. thank you for joining us very much, and thank you all. we appreciate peterson foundation allowed me to participate and i know that pete has a conversation to wrap things up. >> as i contemplated how to close i remember the nobel prize winner of the university of chicago where i was presumably educated. if you have no alternative you have no problem. so i thought about the alternative of delivering the letter delivered to dramatically of course. thank you very much. i deeply appreciate quality of the panel but also the quality of the audience. so thank you and goodbye. [applause] >> president obama met at the white house with key congressional leaders including house speaker john boehner, house democratic leader nancy pelosi, senate majority leader harry reid and a republican mitch mcconnell. the first meeting since the election. they discussed what to do about expiring busheir tax reductions and across-the-board spending cuts set to hit in january called the fiscal cliff. they allowed cameras in the room befo
fulfilling the commitment to us. of course, our thoughts and prayers are with you, governor, and your family. he is a governor dedicated to his people, to the rule of law, and to the future of the united states of america, and we're very pleased and honored to have him here with us today, governor rick scott. [applause] >> good morning. thank you for the introduction. the -- it's great to be here, i want to introduce you to a couple people. this is my wife, ann, married since we were 19 years old. we've been very fortunate. [applause] she makes sure if i say anything, she corrects it, he didn't really say that. she does communications. [applause] [laughter] and then my general council, and he's done a great job. [applause] so ten days after a long and con contentious presidential election, it seems our whole political system has become a constant campaign. one election barely seems to end before in the middle of another one. there is virtually no breaking in between. that leaves us tiredded and a little aggravated. a break is especially important in between elections because elections are ab
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